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20121222
20121230
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
on this, i think i'm a little to her left on a lot of thers foreign policy issues like iraq and the middle east. she's positioned herself just where you want to be, a notch or two to the right of obama on foreign policy, vis-a-vis netanyahu. she never took back her support for the iraq war. it seems to me she's notched pretty close to the model there politically, a good place to run against any republican. >> let's see about that because by that teary if you go all the way back to when the kts first made it to the national stage, bill clinton should have been the favorite of the republicans at the brought the democratic party away from the left and into the middle. instead, of course, you had the bill clinton years were just like the obama years. >> you see this happening again? swrooim saying they're going to find something. it's not always logical, not always about it's this issue -- >> let's get back to the visceral part. not just we're going to run against her because she could potentially be the democratic standard bearer but are we going to hate her? i agree with you -- rana this is
politically? would you put her where i put her on foreign policy to the right of obama? rana? >> i would. >> and safer politically for an election in a general election given the fact people normally want to switch parties every eight years. you don't want to run as a xerox of obama. your thoughts. >> i do think she's to the right on foreign policy. i think what's going to be really interesting is seeing where she is economically. she's been very savvy about using economic statecraft to advance foreign policy goals for the u.s. it will be interesting to see what she brings to the economic debate because i think that's still going to be a debate in the next election. jobs. how to grow, how to get the country back on track. it will be really interesting to see where it comes off. >> i have you as a feminist, everybody is a feminist right now. it's a good position to be in politically. do you think she will have an unusually high draw among women voters? and that's maybe a dumb question, but could she get up to 65% or 70% of the women voters as opposed to 55%. >> that would be a high number
and in iran nuclear program continues to progress. look at the foreign policy challenges facing the united states in 2013. because youry wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it findone, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all youeed is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit sprint.com/drive. aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ >> from iran's nuclear ambition toss china's nationalist im
at the peer review journal of foreign policy and the senior contributor to the. [indiscernible] which many of us, the first things we looked at in the morning. >> after? >> after. and a member of the court association of america. the clerk for the hon. warship berge john and barquette . and while a law student he was an editor from the yale law journal. i believe that is accredited. so as you can see, at two very talented. their debate is entitled to, detention policies. the way we set it up was we have -- in the book we will do it as live. steven will start and then will have great respond. >> great. thank you. it's a pleasure to be here. >> seven the fortitude to invite me to participate. i am a firm believer that the best they we can do as academics is raise the level debate. projects like this can only help in that regard with folks actually engaging with each other as opposed to talking past each other. let me offer couple of brief remarks that i lost a consistent with what i said in the book. i want to suggest that of all the myriad questions one could ask about the future of u.s. de
and as chairman of the foreign relations committee, john's played a central role in every major foreign policy debate for nearly 30 years. as we turn the page on a decade of war, he understands that we've got to harness all elements of american power and ensure that they're working together. >> secretary clinton wasn't present for the announcement. she's still recovering from a concussion. but in a statement she said that kerry is an excellent choice. north korean state media is reporting a u.s. citizen has been arrested in north korea for committing an unspecified crime. they say a tour guide entered north korea more than a month ago, was eventually detained after evidence was uncovered of some sort of crime. this comes ten days after a u.s. official said an american with a similar name was detained in the country. washington has not confirmed if it's actually the same man. >>> an "outfront" update to a story we brought you last night, russia's lower house of parliament has adopted a bill that bans americans from adopting russian children. pretty important when you consider that more than 45,
desires for fairness and justice with regard to our foreign policy, u.s. foreign- policy. i do find that my religious upbringing does -- is interwoven in however prison as. host: rich from tennessee. independent caller. caller: merry christmas, greta. host: good morning, merry christmas. caller: i echo the last caller. i would say my politics changed from republican to it independent. i voted the constitution party the last presidential election. but i found that most people who are serious voters do consider moral beliefs, our laws are based on morality. whether the source is a religion or their own sense of morality which they probably borrowed from other religions, how can you not consider morality and believes when you are voting? otherwise, you are simply pushing a lever based upon whims. to me it is a natural thing to consider religion and believes when -- beliefs when you are considering issues. whether the economy, health care, anything else. it is informed by what you have been taught, how you have been raised, how you feel about fairness and other things. host: does it mak
the president has advocated in this foreign policy? >> yes. >> is that the root cause? >> i think the root cause is not being adequately or not adequately understanding the nature of the evil threat of the the -- the evil of the threat and taking leadership steps and making sure our embassy security and the personnel with whom we are allied with are protected. the people deployed abroad are unbelievably good people who do for us the american people an important service. they need to be protected and regrettably there was a break, a systemic failure. >> 10 seconds or less. she has said that she will testify in mid-january. do you have any reason to doubt that? >> i don't know. the fact that she wasn't here has not testified during these several monthsment we -- several months. to have the secretary of state come up and give an accounting right after this occurred to tell us exactly who knew what and when and the chain of command. was she aware of the incredible risks that went unheeded. >> congressman chris smith. thank you very much. >> the muss 4reu78 brotherhood is claiming a second round on a
with the united states government and that is, i'll support you are foreign policy initiatives in the region by and large if you stay out of my internal affairs. i think that's where he is right now. it appears like the united states government is doing just that. heather: take this beyond the borders of egypt to the area of the middle east, what does this mean for the rest of the ream on? >> well, it is pretty significant. egypt is the a very influential country. even though it is one of the poorest countries in the region, it is a powerful arab country. it has a powerful military for sure and has significant intellectual and cultural influence on the region. so what goes on in egypt truly matters. listen, the contours of this revolutionary change taking place in the middle east, certainly the catalyst for it was democratic and social reform and economic opportunity but the radicals, the muslim brotherhood, are easy seeing the opportunity to advantage themselves geopolitically in the region. that is the danger here. that this continues to move in that direction in other parts of the region.
it means to our own foreign policy. we asked the question yesterday if syria is blowing up and there's defections i will ask ambassador john bolt upon coming up why is it our responsibility? kelly, the u.s. always has to get involved but with tens of thousands people there being killed already maybe it is time. kelly: the ambassador will shed some light on that. i'm looking forward to the conversation as well. definitely something we'll be discussing. meantime, jamie, there are new weather warnings and out there and details on weather delays. we're tracking a massiveo# storm moving across theo# country this busy day aftero# christmas. jamie: a deadly tanker trucko# explosion shuts down a majoro# highway in one of america'so# busiest cities.o# if it is not hard enough to get around how about trying to maneuver around this? we'll tell you what happened. kelly: new details on the deadly ambush that killed two firefighters in webster new york. >> we're being shot at. i am shot. assault rifles. we have multiple firemen down. working fire. [ cellphone chirping ] [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive
to protect, which is a foreign policy concept that if there are people in harm's way that the united states government has a responsibility to protect. jaime: he drew a red line. on top of that he drew the red line, president obama did and said that chemical weapons were the point at which we wouldn't sit back any more. >> right. jaime: so what can we do? >> that was the new red line. that was the new red line. jaime: yes, and what are we equipped to do if we did respond? >> well certainly waiting 21 months of doing practically nothing has made the situation worse. so we are in a deeper problem now. if we would have acted 21 months ago to support the opposition -- look, i think that it's actually more humane to give the opposition enough arms to stop this. if we would have done this months ago we would have been able to have the end of this after six or seven months. but now since we've ignored it 21 months of violence, i don't think is a very moral position to be in. i think if we would have armed the opposition earlier it would have ended earlier, and that's i think a more compelling mora
think having programs that help manufacturers identify foreign markets and resources is critical. the third, i think you have to look at trade and tax policies. there is no doubt in my mind that china's policies are unfair, and not just to american workers. in my judgment, they are unfair to their own middle class. they are supporting elite exporters who have crony relationships with the regime at the expense of giving consumers access to the best products in the world, and we have to make economic fairness of the highest priority in our bilateral relationships with china, and then on tax policy, we have to look at how do we insent vise manufacturers with the right tax credits to invest in the united states? thank you. >> i wondered about obama's national export initiative, doubling them by 2014 if i'm correctly. >> i didn't plant the question. [laughter] >> so i was just wondering, first of all, what do we export? like, what would you say are the strengths where you export, and secondly, what do you think can be done by the government or other institutions in order to promote th
meant that a foreign power or be a overreaching central government would have to think twice before quartering soldiers in our houses without permission or imposing through force policy that is a vast majority of americans wanted to resist to the death. bearing arms is a symbol we're a free people and we control our own destiny. guns became powerful cultural symbol passed from parents to children that includes a respect for nature and a hunting culture that values self-sufficiency and natural food. for the longest time the gun control debate pitted mostly rural americans against urban elites who sometimes fail to respect rural values. i ran for congress in a district with a strong second amendment tradition and i have been around guns my entire life. but i saw the knee-jerk extremism that the right wing caricature of gun control caused with extremist groups like the nra asking, well, what about guns in bars. if you don't support it, you're an enemy of the second amendment. what about guns in church, at the hospital. what about buying ten guns at once? democrats supporting any restri
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)